Dreamer

 

 

I know the questions are difficult to ask.  I know at the time, I wished that I had someone I could have asked, it’s a question you need an answer to.  But how do you ask a person to answer your deepest fear?  How do you ask someone what to do when your mom or dad gets really sick?  What do you do when they die?  How do you live the rest of your life without them?  The thought of it is terrifying, but I can tell you that love is always the answer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As a mother, as a sister, as a friend, the current opioid epidemic is terrifying me.  I want to protect my child, my family and my friends.  I want to keep them safe from the world of addiction.  This disease is taking hold of the lives of people close to me; it is everywhere and the skills we have to deal with addiction are doing nothing to stop it. This is not the kind of addiction we grew up seeing.  Although addiction is addiction, the pace at which opioids take hold is mind-blowing.  The strategies we have used to cope and the secrets we kept, are not a solution.  As the opioid epidemic gets worse, the secrets we are keeping are killing people.

 

 

 

 

How Her Success Can Be My Success

How Her Success Can Be My Success

“I prefer to work with men”, “Men are easier to be friends with, less drama’ or even worse, “I would rather have a male boss’.  Women have been avoiding, or even worse, sabotaging each for years.  Although we all have female friends and relatives, there is some type of societal norm that has been created to force us to compare ourselves to each other and create this unspoken sense of competition.  It is time we stop comparing ourselves to one another and begin to support and promote other women.  We need to realize that her success is not our failure.

 

 

 

 

 

Kindness, a simple term we are taught when we are small.  I am currently teaching my daughter to be kind, to care, to treat others as we want to be treated.  Yet as we get older, as the world become smaller digitally, but far more distant personally; kindness is one of the first things we lose.  We become hurried, we become self-involved, we feel stressed and one of the natural reactions to the overwhelmed feeling of life is to shorten our interactions with others, to be brusque, in essence we lose our kindness.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

What do you want to be when you grow up?  I still ask myself this question on a pretty regular basis.  Considering that I am forty, I find it kind of amusing. Amusing because a teacher of sixteen years and  mother to a two year old should pretty much have it figured out by now and because I assume many people look at me and decide that I am a grown up.  But the truth is I don’t.  I don’t completely know what I want to be, I don’t always see myself as a grown up and that is perfectly okay with me.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What do you want to be when you grow up?  I still ask myself this question on a pretty regular basis.  Considering that I am forty, I find it kind of amusing. Amusing because a teacher of sixteen years and  mother to a two year old should pretty much have it figured out by now and because I assume many people look at me and decide that I am a grown up.  But the truth is I don’t.  I don’t completely know what I want to be, I don’t always see myself as a grown up and that is perfectly okay with me.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I’d rather identify with people than compare myself to them.” This incredibly insightful comment came from my younger brother,  Sean.   Besides being one of my favorite people on the planet,  Sean is smart, empathic and often can capture the essence of a complex idea in a profound statement; just as he did here.   How many times have I sat comparing myself to others,  or worse felt as though people were judging me after comparing my shortcomings to their lives?